Plan drawing by Heather Bizon
Plan drawing by Heather Bizon.

The Master of Architecture II program is for students already holding a professional degree in architecture (B.Arch., or an equivalent first professional degree) who seek a second, master’s-level degree in this discipline and who are interested in developing a stronger theoretical basis for their understanding of the field. Since candidates for this program are expected to have received a professional degree prior to admittance, it should be understood that the degree awarded from this program will not fulfill the educational prerequisite for obtaining an architect’s license in the United States.

This program leads to a degree of Master of Architecture (M.Arch.) and typically requires two years of full-time residency. Because the program combines two years of studio-based activities with a variety of opportunities (both course-related and individually conceived) to extend their understanding of architectural design and its meaning within a broader cultural and social context, students in the M.Arch. II program are given considerable freedom and support to develop an increasingly reflexive, critical, and speculative relationship to their work.

With a number of courses available in the area of history and theory, and with access to a wide variety of Yale courses outside the School of Architecture, post-professional students are able to expand their understanding of the broader cultural context of architecture. Post-professional students are also given opportunities to organize symposia, exhibitions, publications, and seminars. Thus, to an exceptional degree, they are able to shape the curriculum to their own specific interests in collaboration with other students and faculty in the School.

Students in the M.Arch. II program take the required post-professional design studio (1061a) in the first term and in the subsequent three terms choose, through a lottery system, from a variety of advanced design studios, many of which are led by the profession’s leading practitioners and theoreticians. These studios are the same ones offered to M.Arch. I students. With faculty approval, students in their final term may undertake an independent design thesis (1199b) in lieu of an advanced studio. Such a studio may combine written and studio material.

Students are encouraged to explore elective course options. Courses—falling into the broad categories of design and visualization, technology and practice, history and theory, and urbanism and landscape—support and augment the pivotal studio offerings. Courses offered by other schools and departments within the University may be taken for credit.

Course of study

In course titles, a designates fall term, and b designates spring term. The School reserves the right to change the prescribed course of study as necessary.

M.Arch. II: Total Requirement: 72 credits

First Year (Fall)

1061a, Post-Professional Design Studio 9
1062a, Computation Analysis Fabrication 3
Elective* 3
Elective* 3
___
18

First Year (Spring)

Advanced Design Studio 9
3012b, Architectural Theory 3
Elective* 3
Elective* 3
___
18

Second Year (Fall)

Advanced Design Studio 9
3071a, Issues in Architecture and Urbanism 3
Elective* 3
Elective* 3
___
18

Second Year (Spring)

Advanced Design Studio 9
Elective* 3
Elective* 3
Elective* 3
___
18

*Students not on academic warning or probation may substitute independent elective course work. (See the School’s Academic Rules and Regulations for procedures and restrictions.)

Summer preparation courses for incoming M.Arch II students

In the week before the beginning of the fall term, the School offers three preparation courses that are required for incoming M.Arch. II students.

  1. Summer Shops Techniques Course. This one-week course introduces incoming students to the School’s fabrication equipment and shops. The course stresses good and safe shop techniques. Students are not allowed to use the School’s shops unless they have satisfactorily completed this course.
  2. Summer Digital Media Orientation Course. This two-part course, which occurs during the same week as the Summer Shops Techniques Course, covers accessing the School’s servers, the use of the School’s equipment, and the School’s digital media policies and procedures.
  3. Arts Library Research Methods Session. This ninety-minute session covers various strategies to answer research questions pertaining to course curricula and topics by using tools such as the Yale University online catalog, architecture databases, image resources, print resources, and archival resources.

School portfolio

In addition to the 72 satisfactorily completed course credits, a student must satisfactorily complete the portfolio requirement (as described under Academic Regulations in the chapter Life at the School of Architecture) in order to receive an M.Arch. degree. The portfolio requirement is administered and periodically reviewed by the Design Committee.

Academic rules and regulations

Procedures and restrictions for the M.Arch. II program can be found in the School’s “Academic Rules and Regulations” section of the School of Architecture Handbook.

Design and Visualization 14

1111b
Spring 2019
Advanced Design Studio
Pier Vittorio Aureli, Emily Abruzzo
1112b
Spring 2019
Advanced Design Studio
Thomas Phifer, Kyle Dugdale
1113b
Spring 2019
Advanced Design Studio
Brigitte Shim, Andrei Harwell
1114b
Spring 2019
Advanced Design Studio
Yolande Daniels, Gary He
1115b
Spring 2019
Advanced Design Studio
Sandra Barclay, Jean Pierre Crousse, Andrew Benner
1116b
Spring 2019
Advanced Design Studio
Paul Florian, George Knight
1117b
Spring 2019
Advanced Design Studio
Todd Reisz
1118b
Spring 2019
Advanced Design Studio
Anna Dyson, Chris Sharples, Naomi Keena
1216b
Spring 2019
Ornament Theory and Design
Kent Bloomer
1222b
Spring 2019
Diagrammatic Analysis: Recon Modernism
Peter Eisenman, Anthony Gagliardi
1227b
Spring 2019
Drawing Projects
Turner Brooks
1228b
Spring 2019
Disheveled Geometries: Ruins and Ruination
Mark Foster Gage
1242b
Spring 2019
Architecture and Illusion
Brennan Buck
1243b
Spring 2019
Graphic Inquiry
Luke Bulman

Technology and Practice 3

2219b
Spring 2019
Craft, Materials, and Digital Artistry
Kevin Rotheroe
2226b
Spring 2019
Design Computation
Michael Szivos
2230b
Spring 2019
Exploring New Value in Design Practice
Phillip Bernstein, John Apicella

History and Theory 7

3012b
Spring 2019
Architectural Theory
Marta Caldeira
3216a
Spring 2019
Case Studies in Architectural Criticism
Carter Wiseman
3272b
Spring 2019
Exhibitionism: Politics of Display
Joel Sanders
3283b
Spring 2019
After the Modern Movement
Robert A.M. Stern
3287b
Spring 2019
Havana’s Architecture: Recent Past and Possible Future
Esther da Costa Meyer
3288b
Spring 2019
MANY
Keller Easterling
3291b
Spring 2019
GREATS: China’s Big Projects 1949-1980
Amy Lelyveld

Urbanism and Landscape 3

4223b
Spring 2019
History of British Landscape Architecture: 1600 to 1900
Bryan Fuermann
4233b
Spring 2019
Ghost Towns
Elihu Rubin
4240b
Spring 2019
Landscapes of Fulfillment: Architecture and Urbanism of Contemporary Logistics
Jesse LeCavalier